The Results Are In:

I passed.

To advance to the QEP stage, applicants must have achieved a score of 154 on the multiple choice components of the FSOT and an essay score of at least 6 on a 12-point scale. Essays were scored for those candidates who received at least 154 on the multiple choice section.
There are three parts in the multiple choice section. You scored as follows:
Job Knowledge: 57.6

Biographic Questionnaire: 59.84
English Expression: 60.91
Multiple Choice Total: 178.35
Your Essay Score: 7

Congratulations again. We look forward to receiving your Personal Narratives submission.
Sincerely,
The Board of Examiners

Next up in the list of flaming hoops to jump through: Personal Narratives. More soon, folks. I’m off to do my happy dance for a day or three. Keep reading, this adventure isn’t done yet!

‘Till next time.

 

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Waiting is the Worst

I have about 24 hours left until it is likely that the results of the FSOT February exams are released. There will be an email from PearsonVUE sitting in my inbox with answers I have been dreaming about for weeks. I won’t actually get the scores from the test in that email (you have to request those) but I’ll get the pass/fail information.

Before we get there, I thought I’d share my test experience with anyone who was curious. Now, mind you, everyone has to sign NDAs when you take the test and it would be ridiculous of me to risk my chances for a blog. However, while I can’t tell you what was on the test, I can tell you what it was like to take it in Seoul, South Korea. Continue reading

The Countdown Begins

Hello! It’s been a while hasn’t it? I have been hiding from the cold northern winter of South Korea this week. Our high today was 14F (that’s -10C for anyone outside of the USA, Bahamas, Cayman Islands, or Palau). Brrrr! I just got back from my honeymoon in New Zealand and nursing a sunburn in sub-zero temperatures is just insulting! (But so, so, worth it).

The last few weeks have been a blur of planning and studying and stressing and enjoying holidays. I scheduled my exam for February 3rd at 9:00am in Seoul. About 10 more days left! I have been working nearly non-stop on FSOT materials this past month, so for anyone else out there taking the February exam, this is a bit of what I have been studying. Continue reading

SWIFTLY out from the friendly lilt of the band,
The crowd’s good laughter, the loved eyes of men,
  I am drawn nightward; I must turn again
Where, down beyond the low untrodden strand,
There curves and glimmers outward to the unknown        5

The old unquiet ocean. All the shade
Is rife with magic and movement. I stray alone
 Here on the edge of silence, half afraid,
  Waiting a sign. In the deep heart of me
The sullen waters swell towards the moon,       10

And all my tides set seaward.
  From inland
Leaps a gay fragment of some mocking tune,
That tinkles and laughs and fades along the sand,
And dies between the seawall and the sea.       15

Hello, my name is: Halle

That’s Halle like, “Halle Berry,” or “Halley’s Comet,” or “Hallelujah” – take your pick. Or call me Hayley; I usually answer to that too.

I am a sailor, an artist, a student, a teacher, a traveler, a foodie, an adventurer-er, a blogger, and if I’m very, very lucky: a diplomat.

Skills & Hidden Talents:

Continue reading

Twelve Knots: All The Wind I Can Handle

Ocean
View from the bow of S/Y Argo Location: Somewhere off the coast of Africa

Twelve Knots = 14 miles per hour.

Twelve knots of wind is my ideal sailing weather. Back when I sailed The Dread Pirate Roberts (a 12ft dinghy called a Laser) twelve knots of wind was the most I could handle while still staying upright. Too much more than that and I would capsize. For me, twelve knots, has become a bit of a mantra for finding the balance between my limits and flying.